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Literature Review: Atropine for Myopia Control

By Chantel van Wyk
In the review by Foster and Jiang (2014), who summarised the incidence, prevalence, and progression of myopia, it is clear that myopia is an epidemic. Myopia can lead to significant and irreversible vision loss. This calls for urgent intervention of successful myopia control. According to the literature of the last decade, atropine eye drops proves to be one of the most effective treatments to limit myopia progression. The use of atropine for controlling myopia…

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Using red-green anaglyphs in the management of convergence insufficiency

By Prof Paul Ramkissoon
Convergence Insufficiency (CI) is a condition in which the patient has a reduced ability in keeping the alignment of the eyes and maintaining binocular fusion on a near object. This inability to sustain convergence causes the patient to use just one eye at a time, or to see double. Commonly, CI is accompanied by…

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High Myopia: the specificities of refraction and optical equipment

By Christian Franchi, Adèle Longo & Dominique Meslin
The specific needs of highly myopic patients require special attention from Eye Care Professionals. This article describes both the visual discomfort and primary visual disorders associated with high myopia and explains the risks of visual impairment. It also discusses the specificities of refraction and the choice of optical equipment. In addition, it makes recommendations on frame selection and advises on the optimal selection of ophthalmic lenses. In recent years

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Hereditary ophthalmological pathologies in children – 2CPD points

By Josseline Kaplan & Jean-Michel Rozet
Hereditary vision pathologies in children affect all ocular structures. Although of a varying degree of severity, they all impact the sense considered most sacred, justifying the intense amount of research that has been undertaken over the past three decades. A great deal of progress has been made, whether in terms of severe malformations of the anterior chamber or degenerative and inexorably developing pathologies of the retina. This progress has resulted…

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Ethical issues to ponder

By Chris Faul OD
One can only wonder how it came about that optometric practices in South Africa started adopting commercial names, in spite of the HPCSA rules dictating otherwise. Moreover, what is to be achieved with these names? Will they entice the consumer? I am reluctant to pull some names out of the hat as examples in fear that I may offend some practitioners who are in fact using these names. But let me play it safe by erring on the ridiculous with names such as Square Eyes Optometrists, Round Eyes Optometrist and Optical this and Spectacle that. As it is, it is difficult to attain a differential advantage…

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Review of orbital anatomy, the nervous system, and blood supply to the eye and its adnexa

By Diane van Staden PhD
The eye is a complex sensory organ, intricately housed in a portion of the cranium known as the orbit.  For the eye care practitioner, knowledge of the structures surrounding the eye is essential to aid clinical diagnosis.  An understanding of ocular anatomy and the surrounding orbital structure and processes is necessary for an accurate diagnosis of oculomotor, ocular disease, and neuro-ophthalmologic conditions affecting the eye.  Practitioners are therefore advised…

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Understanding Ocular Hypertension

By Prof Paul Ramkissoon
Ocular hypertension (OHTN) refers to raised intra-ocular pressure (IOP) in the presence of normal optic nerve head (ONH) appearance and with no visual acuity (VA) or visual field (VF) loss. Nevertheless, the patient is monitored closely as a glaucoma suspect because high IOP is a risk factor for glaucoma. 

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Overview of Conjunctivitis

By Rayishnee Pillay
The conjunctiva is a thin, translucent membrane that lines the anterior surface of the eye. It comprises a bulbar section covering the visible part of the sclera, ending at the limbus, and a palpebral section that lines the inner surface of the eyelids. It provides a protective barrier against invading pathogens and aids in lubrication of the ocular surface by secreting components of the tear film.

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The case of the young lady with pretty blue eyes and hearing loss

By Marolize Botha
A 12 Year old African female presented at a school screening. She attends a school for learners with special educative needs (LSEN). She has hearing aids in both her ears, but communicates normally. She previously wore spectacles but lost them. She struggles to see both at distance…

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